2011.05.22—02.24.50—2816 x 2112.jpg
2011.06.14—17.57.16—5616 x 3744.jpg
2011.05.22—02.24.50—2816 x 2112.jpg

Climb on the Roof of the World


SCROLL DOWN

Climb on the Roof of the World


Despite being on the backside of the Himalayas and home to a good number of 6000 and 7000m peaks, climbing tourism in the Pamirs is insignificant compared to that in Nepal, China, Pakistan or even Kyrgyzstan. As such, there are many unclimbed 4000-6000m peaks, and significant new route potential on peaks in the 6000-7500m range. Thus, those looking for a Himalayan climbing experience well off the beaten path should seriously consider heading into the Pamirs.

The Pamirs also offer many single and multi-pitch rock climbing opportunities. Only a handful of routes have been established though—there are many more waiting for adventuresome climbers. Being in the rain-shadow of the greater Himalayan ranges, the Pamirs also boasts relatively stable and predictable weather.

This pristine region also has its disadvantages for inexperienced climbers: the transportation and health infrastructure is lacking; route information ranges from non-existent to sparse; there are only a handful of locals with technical mountaineering or climbing experience.

The Pamirs are also home to incredibly interesting cultures, a fascinating history, and amazing landscapes. Thus, even if climbing in the Pamirs is not for you, there are ample other ways to enjoy the region. 

 

 

2011.06.14—17.57.16—5616 x 3744.jpg

Testimonials


SCROLL DOWN

Testimonials


What climbers are saying about the Pamirs:

We reached the summit [of Karl Marx Peak] around 3PM and found a old plaque with a bust of Karl Marx from the Soviet days. There was a great panorama from the summit of the Pamirs to the north and the Hindu Kush in Pakistan to the south. Separating us from Pakistan was the Wakhan Corridor in Afghanistan...
— Steve Swenson, USA
Local people are friendly, and the region offers spectacular, unspoiled scenery, with no crowds and great faces to climb.
— Matic Jost, Slovenia
we endured the long jeep ride; winding roads alternating dirt and pavement, hugging closely to the bed of the Panj River, which traces the border with Afghanistan. Eventually we reached the picturesque town of Khorog, which would give way to striking mountain vistas and the lush valleys bellow.
— Jenn Flemming, USA
enormous potential for new routes remains
— John Proctor, UK